Dr. Kasirer-Friede Ana

Dr. Kasirer-Friede Ana

Dr

UC San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, United States of America, 92093-0726

plus Speciality

HAEMATOLOGY

Biography:

Name:                        ANA KASIRER-FRIEDE

                                   Department of Medicine,

                                   University of California, San Diego

                                    e-mail: akasirer@ucsd.edu

Tel:                             H: (858) 546-3888, W: (858) 822-6578


EDUCATION

PhD.            Dean’s Honor List.

                     McGill University. Montreal, Canada. School of Medicine, Division of                 

                     Experimental Medicine.

M.Sc.           Université de Montréal, Montreal, Canada. Department of Pharmacology.

B.Sc.            McGill University. Montreal, Canada. First Class Honors in Biology.


ACADEMIC POSITIONS

Date: July 2008-present

Title: Associate Project Scientist

Department:  Medicine/Division of Hematology/Oncology

Institution: University of California, San Diego

City: La Jolla, CA

 

 

Date: July 2004- June 2008

Title: Assistant Project Scientist,

Department:  Medicine/Division of Hematology/Oncology

Institution: University of California, San Diego

City: La Jolla, CA

 

Date: Sept. 1999 - June 2004

Title: Research Associate,

Department: Cell Biology,

Institution: Scripps Research Institute,

City: La Jolla, CA

 

ACADEMIC AWARDS and HONOURS

Dean's Honour List, PhD thesis, McGill University

B.Sc. First Class Honours, McGill University  

Scholarship for Academic Achievement, Carleton University in Ottawa

 

FELLOWSHIPS

2004-2006   American Heart Association Postdoctoral Fellowship   $88,000.00, role as PI.

Academic positions:

ACADEMIC POSITIONS

Date: July 2008-present

Title: Associate Project Scientist

Department:  Medicine/Division of Hematology/Oncology

Institution: University of California, San Diego

City: La Jolla, CA

 

 

Date: July 2004- June 2008

Title: Assistant Project Scientist,

Department:  Medicine/Division of Hematology/Oncology

Institution: University of California, San Diego

City: La Jolla, CA

 

Date: Sept. 1999 - June 2004

Title: Research Associate,

Department: Cell Biology,

Institution: Scripps Research Institute,

City: La Jolla, CA

Research interests:

My interests are three fold.

Hemostasis and Thrombosis.  Cardiovascular disease, one of the major killers in the civilized world, is responsible for millions of deaths worldwide every year. Platelets are central to the acute phase of myocardial infarction and stroke. I have spent the majority of my research time investigating adhesion mechanisms and signal transduction pathways in blood cells, with a focus on platelets. As platelets must be able to adhere to matrices that become exposed upon vascular injury and resist hydrodynamic shear stresses that would remove them, many of my studies have utilized various in vitro flow models including microfluidics flow chambers that I designed in collaboration with a Physics laboratory at UCSD, to mimic physiologic flow conditions. Firm platelet adhesion is highly dependent on the presence of functional bidirectional signaling to activate integrins and subsequent signals from ligand-bound integrins to reorganize cytoskeletal networks. I aim to utilize a wide range of techniques, from whole animal studies, to molecular biology, multiple imaging platforms and various model cell systems, to gain an understanding of the underlying intracellular networks that are involved in integrin dependent mechanotransduction in platelets. My endeavors in the platelet field, have led me to make some important contributions and have been published in top tier journals in the field.

Platelets as Immune Cells. Whereas platelets were traditionally viewed as an essential component of hemostasis and thrombosis, recent studies have demonstrated that they can additionally modulate the function of immune and tumor cells and thereby participate in inflammation, host defense and cancer progression. Activated platelets secrete cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and angiogenic factors from intracellular storage granules, which can alter the growth and activation state of cells in the vascular domain. Platelets additionally may bridge to leukocytes and tumor cells via their surface receptors. Interestingly, several major diseases such as arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and cancer, which are known to have an immune component, are accompanied by thrombotic complications. I am interested in the mechanisms regulating platelet-immune cell interactions, and in developing novel strategies for studying their interactions at a cellular and molecular level.

Cell-context Integrin Regulation. As the holygrail for therapeutic development is to optimize specificity and efficacy of targeted molecules, it is important to fully understand cellular signaling pathways in the native cells of interest. Although integrin proximal interactions are beginning to be elucidated at an atomic and molecular level, it is becoming clear that although specific isoforms of integrin proximal regulatory molecules may vary between cell types, there is often functional conservation. However, in some cases, the peri-integrin signaling pathways are highly cell-context specific, as proteins identified in one cell type are either not expressed or their homologues lack function in other cell types. Thus, I am interested in the system level organization of signaling pathways in diverse mammalian cells.

Any other information:

Although I am not the Principal Investigator of my research unit, I have initiated and developed research projects, mentored post-docs, supervised technicians, established interdisciplinary collaborations and have written grants. My studies have been presented at national and international conferences. Furthermore, I have contributed to the scientific literature through peer-reviewed research papers, chapters in a medical textbook, and most recently, to the Springer Online Encyclopedia of Signaling Molecules that will appear in 2012. Thus, I have experience in assessing the research and stylistic quality of articles.

 

What I think of the idea behind WebmedCentral and WebmedCentral plus:

I think the idea behind Med Central can work. I think the Scientific Community's confidence in the Website would depend on the ultimate quality of the online publications. It would be perhaps to the advantage of Webmed Central to develop a niche area where it can "compete" for high interest articles.